Archive for home safety

10 Steps to a Safer Home

A safe home is essential for protecting your family, but safety stems from more than just alarms and cameras. Security products are an important piece of the safety puzzle, but the glue that holds the puzzle together is practicing safety protocols. Unless your whole family knows how to use security equipment and routinely trains for potential hazards, you may not be prepared when you need it most. Try the following tips to maintain a safe home:

1. Smoke alarms: If you don’t already have them, install smoke alarms in every room of your home. Most models chirp when the battery is running low, but if you’re on vacation when a unit chirps and it dies before you return home, you may never know that you’re unprotected. Make a new habit of manually checking the batteries on every smoke alarm in your home at least every three to six months. Take your security a step further by planning a fire escape route with your family so everyone knows the safest way out.

2. Lighting: Outdoor lighting can be an effective method of deterring theft, especially motion-sensor lighting. Thieves prefer to burgle homes that provide hiding spaces, such as lush foliage and darkness. Apart from theft deterrent, lighting indoor and outdoor areas such as stairs and foyers can prevent you and your family from tripping in the dark.

3. Locks: Many thieves enter a home through an unlocked door or window. Always lock all doors and windows when leaving the house and when sleeping. Dead bolts can be installed on main entrances as an added precaution.

4. Glass break detectors: Consider purchasing glass break detectors and installing them on your lower level windows. These inexpensive devices emit an alarm if windows are broken, which can scare thieves away.

5. Security alarm: Security alarms are a pricier, yet effective method of theft deterrent. Security companies will alert the proper authorities if your home is broken into, which offers peace of mind while you’re away. If this option is too much of a stretch for your budget, you can get a fake (yet realistic!) yard sign and/or window sticker advertising that your home is protected by a security company.

6. Security cameras: Cameras can help you monitor the happenings in and around your home, which includes keeping a watchful eye on pets, children and nannies. If a thief breaks into your home, the video footage may be what helps the police catch the culprit. Again, if this option is too expensive, you can get dummy cameras to scare away thieves.

7. Poison hazards: Children will put anything in their mouths, from fingers to toys to harmful chemicals. All medications and cleaning products should be kept in child-proofed cabinets, out of reach of small children. The same should be done with breakable and sharp objects that may harm curious little fingers.

8. Cooking hazards: Kitchens are the most common place for fire ignition in a home. Always cook with caution and keep a fire extinguisher nearby. Turn pan handles inward to avoid accidental spills, keep towels and other flammable items away from heated appliances and never leave cooking food unattended. If you have young children, explain to them that they must stay at least three feet away from the stove or oven when in use for their own safety.

9. Tripping hazards: Loose wires and clutter can cause trips and falls, which are the leading cause of home injuries. Walk around your home periodically to check for such areas and take the necessary steps. Coil wires neatly against the wall, use no-slip mats under rugs, tidy up your children’s toys, etc.

10. Social media announcements: Avoid announcing your vacations online. Anyone can interpret this information as an opportunity to rob your home. In fact, you want your home to maintain that lived-in look at all times. Ask a trusted neighbor or friend to collect your mail while you’re away and use motion-sensor lights indoors to make it seem like you’re home.

Not only are these safety measures good for the overall wellbeing of you and your family, but safe homes may be eligible for lower insurance premiums or discounts. Ask your agent if you qualify today.

Ice Dams – Home Insurance Companies

Oklahoma homeowners have seen very warm weather and very cold weather so far this year.  However, homeowners in the Northeast are experiencing one of the most severe winters in recent history.   Here is an article about ice dams that have been a problem for Oklahoma homeowners in the past and certainly for homeowners in the Northeast now.  Click here to read it.

 

Oklahoma Ice Storm – Falling is Greatest Risk

We should all take extra precautions when driving on the ice;  however, we should also be aware that most serious injuries will result from people falling on their driveways, sidewalks and parking lots.  Please spread the word and keep in mind that these areas may stay slick for several days.

Here is a link to some Winter Safety Tips….How To Walk on the Ice.  http://www.co.williams.oh.us/Health%20Comm/falling_is_a_serious_concern_for.htm

 

 

 

 

 

Oklahoma Home Insurance Safety

Keeping your home secure

Oklahoman homeowners want to keep their home safe from burglars or intruders, but not everyone wants to have an alarm system installed. There are plenty of people who prefer the do-it-yourself route, whether it’s home improvement or home security.

And nowadays, there are more options than ever when it comes to home security, so Statewide Insurance Agency wants to help you sort through those options with a few tips.

Do-it-yourself options

The widespread availability of electronic tools means that Oklahoma homeowners can set up their own monitoring systems if they choose, without the help of a home-security company.

  • Cameras: Smaller and more inexpensive than ever, cameras can be placed nearly anywhere on the exterior of your home and monitored from inside wirelessly — or set to record footage for review later. Available software even allows you to point your laptop camera in a particular direction (say, at the front door) and check the images from a remote location.
  • Lights: Motion-detecting floodlights are an excellent deterrent to thieves, because they don’t want to be seen. Make sure they’re installed near entryways, and that they aren’t easily reached from the ground. And using timers for interior lights is a good way to give the appearance that your home is occupied.
  • Alarms: Vibration alarms are available for windows, alerting you if someone is trying to get in. Similarly, other monitors can be installed near doors and programmed to sound if a person comes within a set distance. Some even emit barking sounds to make it appear that a dog is in the house.

Even if you aren’t interested in installing security equipment around your home, there are a number of things you can do to increase safety and keep your Oklahoma home insurance quotes at a minimum.

  • Keep your home locked. It sounds simple, but you’d be surprised how many people leave windows or doors unlocked. Make sure that sliding doors and windows have extra security, such as a track lock or dowel in the track.
  • Don’t leave a key outside. If you need to provide access to your home while you’re away, leave your key with a trusted neighbor or friend.
  • Watch the landscaping. Thick shrubs and bushes around your porch or yard can give thieves a good place to hide. Keep them well-trimmed and ensure that problematic areas can be illuminated with your outdoor lighting.
  • Use common sense. If you’re going away on vacation, cancel your newspaper and other deliveries. Ask a neighbor to keep watch, and park a car out front. Don’t post publicly on social media or leave a message on your answering machine or voicemail indicating that you’ll be away for an extended period.

Burglars really do consider deterrents such as alarms, cameras, dogs, etc., when looking at targets, according to a study released by the University of North Carolina.  So a small investment in security can make a big difference!

Sidebar:

It’s a great time for a home inventory

If your home was burglarized, would you know what was missing? A home inventory is a crucial tool to help replace everything that was lost. And we can help you do one! Give us a call at 405-285-2929 or visit our website at https://okstatewide.com  to learn more.

Contact Us!

 At Statewide Insurance Agency, we can work with you to make sure you’ve got the coverage you need, while at the same time using all possible credits and discounts to make that coverage affordable. Just give us a call at {agency-phone-number} or send us a note at info@okstatewide.com.  We want to help you meet your goals, and make sure what’s important to you is protected!

 

Moore, OK Home Insurance Quotes

When Water Goes Where It Shouldn’t

Even a small leak can become a major problem for homeowners in Moore, OK,  so knowing what you’re covered for and how to prevent water damage are equally important.  The below tips should help uncover any potential water problems down the road and keep your property dry.

Check appliance hoses.  Standard hoses are not as durable as they used to be.  Replace rubber hoses with steel-braided hoses. This is a low cost fix that can save thousands in water damage.

Broken tiles in the shower can allow water to leak into the walls or on the floor. Replace cracked tiles and re-grout when needed.

Run dishwasher and washing machine only when you are home.  If a leak occurs, you can turn the appliance off right away.

When on vacation, turn off the main water supply to your house.

Keep storm drains near your house clear of leaves.

Install a gutter guard.  This can prevent a rooftop disaster caused by drain clogs, and also prevents flooding by water that isn’t carried away from the house.

Install a water pressure gauge.  An inexpensive gauge can prevent damage caused by water pressure that’s too high.  Pressure should be between 60 and 80 PSI.

Moore homeowners can save money on their home insurance quotes by avoiding water damage losses thereby having a clean claim record.

 

 

 

National Fire Prevention Week

It’s Fire Prevention Week and we are learning about staying safe in the kitchen.  @nfpa http://j.mp/1qo2wcE